Creating Recordings for Your Students: Tools for Your Toolbox

We have posted about quite a few screencasting and video recording options here on the 1900 blog (see examples A, B, and C), but sometimes it can be hard to identify the right tool for the job.

To help, we have organized a few methods for recording content into different categories of needs: recording mini-lectures, working through problems and examples, and capturing standalone video or audio. Continue reading to see an overview. Click to download the PDF files underneath each category for more detailed information that can help you get started.

Hopefully, this format can help you decide which tools meet your needs. But if you are not sure, contact the ID Team. We can help.

Recording Mini-Lectures

Pre-recorded mini-lectures can be a very effective way to share your expertise with your students. They can come in handy if you want to:

  • Address gaps in students’ prior knowledge that are needed to understand aspects of your course
  • Introduce a difficult, new topic and allow students to re-review it a few times
  • Provide various examples, case studies, or anecdotes
  • Correct the common mistakes that you observe in students’ work
  • Create resources for your online or hybrid courses

Pre-recorded lectures are most effective (and most likely to be viewed) in short, topical segments that are around five minutes long.

The following methods can help you record mini-lectures:

Method What is captured?
Record audio narration for PowerPoint slides and save the presentation as a video. Then, upload the video to YouTube. PowerPoint slides, audio
Click for an example
YouTube videos with visual aids Video, audio
Click for an example
Screencast-O-Matic used to record your favorite presentation tool Any visual aid or software that can be displayed on your computer screen (PowerPoint, Word, Prezi, websites, etc.)
Audio
Webcam video (optional)
Click for an example using Prezi

Click here to download more information about what you need to get started with each of these methods.

Working Through Problems and Examples

Many courses require students to solve problems. Often the best way for them to learn how to solve problems is by watching someone walk and think through each of the required steps. When this process is recorded, students have the power to speed up or slow down the process and watch it as many times as they need to before it sticks.

These tools allow you to record demos and solutions:

Method What is captured?
Screencast-O-Matic used to capture worked problems in Excel or PowerPoint Audio, Excel cells, or PowerPoint slides
Webcam video (optional)
Click for an example
Screencast-O-Matic used to capture any website or software Any website or software that can be displayed on your computer screen
Mouse clicks and movement
Audio
Webcam video (optional)
This is a great process for making tutorials, just like the intro video for the new portal.
Webcam, smartphone camera or other video recorder used to capture written work on paper or a whiteboard Audio, Video
Paper or whiteboard
Click for an example
Echo Smartpen used to capture written notes and audio Written notes that are automatically digitized and synchronized with your audio to result in “pencasts”
Click for a demo or view Bill Weaver’s Prezi
Educreations and a stylus to record narrations, images and writings Solutions to written problems and equations
Audio narration
Images
Annotations
Click for an example by Pat Bicknell

Click here to download more information about what you need to get started with each of these methods.

Capturing Standalone Video or Audio: Video Tours, Interviews, and Welcome Messages

If you have a smartphone with a video camera or a webcam, you can create audio or video resources for your students. For example, you can:

  • Take video whenever you visit a location that is related to your topic of study and discuss a few relevant points
  • Conduct interviews
  • Record welcome messages or reminders for your students

These tools can be used to capture video or audio:

Method What is captured?
Video from a webcam, smartphone camera or other video recorder posted to YouTube Video, Audio
Audio-only content recorded by Audacity and posted to Blackboard Audio

Click here to download more information about what you need to get started with each of these methods.

One thought on “Creating Recordings for Your Students: Tools for Your Toolbox

  1. Pingback: Blackboard Webinar Recording: Tips and Tricks for Utilizing Video and Media | 1900

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